So who wants to dance with the rabbit down the hole? : PODCAST

The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places.

But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.

Ernest Hemingway

I’ve done it. You’ve done it. We’ve said “it’s fine” when really… things weren’t fine. Sometimes I’ve said it as a joke (like when I’m calf deep in mud on a ride) or as a way of lifting my spirits (like after 9 hours of riding in the rain). And I said it a lot after PBP when things just weren’t right. It’s fine, I’d say, I’ll heal. It’ll be all right. I’ll just take some downtime. It’s to be expected. It was a big event. My mind just needs some time to heal. I just need some quiet time. Okay, a lot of quiet time. Yes things are rough but it’s just post-event blues. Just post-travel hangover. Just settling back in to being home again after so long away.

It’s fine. It’s fine. It’s fine…

And then it became very clear that things were, indeed, very not fine. At. All.

What it’s about

Jen says: This time, Tiff returns to share the aftermath of the race – the physical, mental and emotional trauma it inflicted on her, the depression that followed and how she was able to recover from it and get back on her bike.

In this episode, Tiff shares: 

* the anti-climatic finish line,

* her physical recovery from the race including how long it took for her to get a full night’s sleep and for her neck to work properly again,

* how she was ultimately diagnosed with depression as a result of the trauma the ride inflicted on her (or, as Tiff recognises in this conversation, that she inflicted on herself),

* why too much mental toughness can be a bad thing, 

* why she committed to another 1,200km ride (called the ‘Geelong Flyer’) only 7 weeks after she arrived home (and while still recovering from the PBP-related depression)

* why she had to learn how to ride her bike again after PBP,

* the moment she realised she was ‘back’ 1,100km into the Geelong Flyer,

* what she learnt from PBP – the race itself and the aftermath,

* how many donuts were consumed during PBP (the answer might surprise you!)

* what’s next for her.

This is a very different conversation from part 1.

It’s a very raw and vulnerable conversation and I truly appreciate Tiff’s honesty in sharing her struggles after PBP, the support she received and how she found her way through.

How to listen

To listen to the podcast on, click your link of choice below:

Note however that it’s probably best to listen to this with headphones on…

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